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Posted inCLIMATE & ENVIRONMENT

Research shows that medical caregivers often don’t know what tick bites look like on Black and brown skin. That can mean delayed diagnoses of Lyme disease and other illnesses.

Minnesota’s tick season starts as soon as the snow melts. The tiny, blood-sucking arachnids enjoy the same conditions that draw us out into nature every year. Experts warn that people of color are being diagnosed with tick-borne illnesses later than white patients, and that a warming climate could encourage the spread of ticks.